2008-04-17 / The Office Cat

The Office Cat

Eagle is Robersons' pond-watcher

The Bolton Lunceford Playhouse (Washington Little Theater Company (WLTCo) has a first coming up. For several weeks now, Buzzy Randall, WLTCo vice-president in charge of the playhouse, has been conversing by phone and e-mail with a couple who want to be married in the theater. Plans have been finalized and on September 13, Rachel Jobe of Brooklyn, N.Y., and Treavor Reese of Martinez, Ga., will be married in the playhouse. Both bride and bridegroom are graduates of the University of Georgia and wanted to be married in a theater in a small town. Through the internet they located Washington, contacted Buzzy, and last Saturday visited Washington and the playhouse. They were pleased and decided the playhouse here is what they want, so they have rented it for their wedding. The bridegroom's parents also visited were with the couple.

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A group of Acteens from the First Baptist Church, Washington, went on a mission trip to Ducktown, Tennessee, during their spring break from school. Acteens is a missions organization for teenage girls. The girls, along with their leader, Tara Townsend, assisted in many ways in the Copper Basin Crisis Center in Ducktown and carried many supplies which had been donated by the church or collected by the organization. They gave a report on the trip during the evening worship service at First Baptist Sunday. Acteens on the trip with Tara were Sarah Shouse, Brittany Corley, Taylor McCarthy, Rebecca Davis, Calli Nickels, Jasmine Colunga, Fallon West, and Betsy Ross.

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Washington-Wilkes has another new and beautiful business in Downtown Washington! Retro Cinema & Books opened Friday in what has been most recently called the Singleton Building between the police department and the former location of the officesof Dr. W.C. Branan. Owned by Dana and Richard Kibbey, the business features a movie theater with 60 seats; new books, DVDs, CDs, and a complete concession area offering popcorn, drinks, candy, and hotdogs. The bookstore has been decorated by Richard, using his rare Hollywood memorabilia from his private collection. The movie theater is state-of-the-art digital picture and sound. Movies will be shown on Friday and Saturday nights at 7:30 and matinees on Saturday and Sunday at 1:30. The opening movie was "The Eye of the Dolphin." You can see a listing of this week's movies in their advertisement in this week's paper. It's a beautiful place!

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A rarely-seen Eagle has claimed residence in an old dead pine tree near a pond on Gayle and Willie Roberson's property on the Lincolnton Road (close to the city limits.) They say the Eagle mostly sits in his tree, watching the pond until something surfaces that interests him for his next meal. On the day that our photographer was on the scene, Gayle said that he had just watched the Eagle for about 20 minutes as he soared around the pond and probably the ponds of the Maynards down the road a bit.

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Whereas the last production of The Washington Little Theater Company -- Fiddler on the Roof -- had a huge cast, the next production will feature just two Washington-Wilkes veteran actors. Gail and Tom Duggan will star in the musical comedy, "I Do! I Do," May 8-11. Hilarious comedy, lilting songs, and superb acting will make for an entertaining evening, says Director Jo Randall.

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The Concert Choir from Brewton Parker College will present a concert at the First Baptist Church Thursday evening, April 17, at 7 p.m. The choir was well-received in its concert here last year.

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Mary Virginia Blackmon of Columbus, Wilkes County native, sent a note with a clipping from the Columbus newspaper this week. Since we have a Mule Day in October, Mary thought we might be interested in the one to be held in Columbia, Tennessee. It's a bit bigger than our Mule Day with 2,500 mules expected to be the center of attention. Mule Day began in Columbia in 1934 and has grown so much that up to 150,000 people are expected to attend this year's special activities.

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Next Wednesday (May 23) the long-awaited Tour de Georgia will begin one of its stages right here in Washington-Wilkes. At 5:00 a.m. Court Street from the Fire Department to the Farmers Market will be closed, and the courthouse will be closed until 1 p.m. The race starts from The Square at 11 a.m. Downtown restaurants will open at 7 a.m. Vendors and sponsors' tents will be on The Square beginning at 8 a.m. For more details, see complete coverage elsewhere in this paper.

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As part of the Tour de Georgia celebration, the Washington-Wilkes Arts Foundation is sponsoring a street dance on The Square on Tuesday night, April 22, at 8 p.m. Featured band will be the awardwinning Playback.

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Rainfall since last week measures just .3 on an inch, for a total of 2.45 for the month of April. Norris says the estimated rainfall for April is 2.94 inches.

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After producing her special and beautiful series of commemorative plates featuring historic events and places in Wilkes County, Rosemary Hopkins, along with her sister, Nancy Talbert Moore, and brother, Johnny Talbert, has come out with a set of South Carolina history plates. All three are natives of McCormick, S.C., and thought that it would be appropriate for South Carolina to have its own history plates. They will be meeting with the governor and first lady of South Carolina at the end of the month to present them a set for use in the governor's mansion. . . . Rosemary says that after Johnny read about the chinaberry incident involving him in this column last week, he called her. He said that not only did the doctor see the piece of metal in his forehead, but the person who did the scan told him right off that it was there. Rosemary says they can't figure it out. "I know I hit him with full force, and unless a tiny bit of the hammer broke off, we just don't know how it got there, but it is right in the place where his scar is."

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One more Chinaberry tale! Doris Rhodes says that when she was a child, she spent every summer with her grandparents, Roy and Ida Adams Blakey, near Danburg. Absolutely nobody was ever allowed to so much as touch the beautiful Chinaberry tree near the front porch. Her grandmother referred to it as her "lovely China tree." It was not until after Doris married that she learned about the China Tree. Her grandmother's mother died when her children were very young and Doris' grandmother assumed the role of caregiver to her two brothers, sister and father. Shortly following the death of their mother, their father moved them from Hart County to begin a new life. Grandmother pulled up some small seedlings from the homeplace to "tame" the mules as they moved to Lincoln County in wagons. The China Tree still stands today and Doris says she still admires it even though it is all tattered and torn. Now she understands why the tree was a special tree. It reminded grandmother of her roots.

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