2009-09-24 / The Office Cat

Lots of rain but not like Atlanta

The Office Cat

From all reports, the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation Fall Ramble in Wilkes County last weekend was a tremendous success. There were more than 275 people registered for the event and it seemed that they were "all over everywhere." I'm sure they spent some money in Washington- Wilkes in addition to their lodging and food. In spite of all the rain, I've heard nothing but very good compliments on every aspect of the Ramble. After touring several homes and churches in the Danburg area Friday afternoon, they enjoyed dinner at Peacewood Plantation on the Tignall Road and no complaints were heard about the rain or mud. After an early-morning breakfast at the First Baptist Church, catered by Jean Davis-Blair and her efficient crew from Alfred's On The Square, the ramblers adjourned to the church sanctuary where our

Mark Waters told them all about Washington-Wilkes, and "The Lost Gold of the Confederacy." I wasn't there, but I've heard that his presentation was very well received. . . . From about 10:30 a.m. until 5 p.m., they toured Washington homes, museums, churches, and the Mary Willis Library, stopping long enough to have lunch at the First United Methodist Church. . . . I was privileged to tour the newly-restored

Gilbert-Alexander-Wright Home which has been the pride and joy of Robert Aiken and his fine crew of workers. Kurt Wolfe graciously showed me some of the "behind the scenes" problems and solutions of the restoration. One of the rooms which "has not been touched yet" was as I remember having seen it in the 1960s when it was the home of Alexander and Lotte Wright. . . . I hope that it can be open to the public soon.

ƒ

Something that I especially enjoyed at Fairfield Plantation (The Gilbert-Alexander-Wright home) was the grounds which are beautiful and immaculate. Just outside the back door is a very large Buckeye tree. As children, we searched the woods for buckeyes so that we could keep one in our pocket for "good luck," but the trees that we saw were so tall we never actually saw how the fruit was produced. This tree at Fairfield was loaded with buckeyes and they had not yet opened to discharge the buckeyes. . . . Another interesting planting was a pomegranate tree or bush. We had one in the yard at our home (the Rider house) when I was a child and I had forgotten what interesting plants they are.

ƒ

The late Joe Charping was remembered at the Memory Lane Cruisers Fall Cruise-In on September 12. Joe was a founding member of the Cruisers and owned a 1955 Chevrolet which he and

Ann always brought to The Square for the Cruise-In. The Cruise-In was dedicated to him and his family was presented a large collage of pictures and memorabilia from past cruiseins.

ƒ

Sonny Johnson reports that he recorded a total of 8.98 inches of rain in the Tyrone area from Monday, September 14, until Monday, September 21. Thursday was when he says we got the most with 4.4 inches recorded. Friday and Saturday brought 2.8 inches; and Sunday, 1.6 inches. His total for the year is 46 inches. . . . on Hill Street in Washington, Norris Ware recorded a total of 4.25 inches for the week, with 2.1 inches falling on Thursday night. He has 5.25 inches for the month. Other individuals report 3 and 4 inches for Thursday night in the Washington area. . . . Another report says that on Highway 44 around Carter's Grove Baptist Church, 12 inches was recorded. . . . Whatever the totals were -- it's the most rain we've had for a long, long time.

ƒ

Several readers have called to ask if we know why gas prices are so much higher in Wilkes County than in surrounding counties. I don't know. The lowest I saw on U.S. 78 through Washington last week was $2.35 and that was just for a few hours. Prices today (Monday) range from $2.39 to $2.49. Prices in the Thomson area have been as low as $2.20; in Elberton, $2.21-$2.23; and In North Augusta, $2.15.

ƒ

I think we've about seen the end of the beautiful and interesting hummingbirds. I've seen three or four in recent days; and Kay Nelms said she had a surge to about 10 Saturday. . . . Jack Loadholt, who lives on Wansley Road in the Tignall area, says that about six weeks ago he had as many as 40 or 50. His son and daughter-in-law came from St. Simons Island for a visit at that time, helped him to count, and made many pictures of the beauties. But he says that now he's just seeing three or four.

ƒ

Patricia Burton, who comes to Washington-Wilkes from LA (Lower Alabama), subscribes to her hometown newspaper (good for her), The Wilcox Progressive Era, in Camden, Ala. The editor,

Hollis Curl, must like hummingbirds as much as some of us here in Washington-Wilkes do, because he frequently writes about them. Patricia brought me last week's paper in which he reports seeing a rare male Rufous hummingbird feeding right alongside the more common Ruby Throated birds which are our most common ones here. The Rufous hummer nests along the coast of western Canada and coastal Alaska, and is rarely seen here or in Alabama. The Rufous stayed aout 10 days. The editor says, "Hummingbirds of all varieties are very territorial and spend about as much time chasing each other away from feeders as they do actually feeding." If you've spent much time watching them, you know how true that is.

ƒ

Flora Ann and Sam Clary McGill went to Augusta Saturday to see their grandson, Samuel McGill, participate in Cross-Country competition with his team from Aiken High School. Samuel placed second in the contest which included several schools. His time was 17 minutes, 32 seconds. The first place winner just barely won over Samuel with a 17 minutes, 22 seconds time. Samuel is the son of Sam and Dana McGill of Aiken.

ƒ

The News-Reporter has an advertisement this week for Falling Creek Farms near Stephens and Maxeys on the Union Point Highway. Owners are Emmett and Jenni Cabaniss. Emmett is the nephew of Dr. Harvey Cabaniss, well-known and beloved retired dermatologist in Athens. During his active practice Dr. Cabaniss had many patients from Wilkes County. . . . Falling Creek Farms has a corn maze, pumpkin patch, hayrides, a petting zoo, and a real Native American Teepee, and they are celebrating "Maize Daze" this fall. It looks like a good place to visit for field trips, schools, church groups, and individuals. Check out all the details in their advertisement elsewhere in the newspaper.

ƒ

Return to top