2010-07-08 / The Office Cat

The Office Cat

Wile E. tries to visit The Beagle A
Augusta has a new library which opened on Telfair Street the weekend of June 25. Augusta Chronicle columnist Bill Kirby’s column Sunday was about the old library on Greene Street. He had encouraged people to write their memories of the old library and Sunday used one from a former Wilkes County native.

Neina Wansley Thompson grew up in Washington, daughter of the late

Nita and “T” (William) Wansley. They lived on East Robert Toombs Avenue in the house next door (east) to where Mark and Emilie Waters now life, and then on south Jefferson Street. “T” was a policeman and all the young people loved him. He later became a GBI Agent. . . Neina told about how the old Greene Street library had a Talking Book Center. Her son Jamie was born legally blind and later lost his remaining sight. The Talking Book Center and the larger library building became regular place for them to visit. She says that not many days went by that Jamie didn’t listen to his talking books, and they traveled with them when they went on vacation trips. Jamie became ill last year and died after a brief illness. His talking book machine and books went to the hospital with him to provide familiar comfort.

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In a special ceremony following a delicious dinner in the fellowship hall, Sunday, June 27, members of the First United Methodist Church burned the final note on their newlyconstructed fellowship hall. On July 7, 2006, they negotiated for a loan of $600,000 and promptly paid $200,000 in cash, leaving a balance of $400,000. Through many special contributions, pledges, and fundraising projects, the final payment was made to the bank Friday, June 25. . . . Rev. Gale Seibert, pastor, says she and all the members are excited that they are free at last and can now concentrate on their ministry and mission activities. A trip to El Salvador is set for July 14-21 when a group from the church will travel there to assess the situation, and make future plans.

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Marvin Hudson, our Major League Baseball umpire, is pictured on the cover of the July issue of Referee magazine. Marvin was “behind the plate” in that recent game in which the pitcher had a no-hitter going until the ninth inning when the first base umpire called the runner out and all the re-plays and other umpires said he was safe. The umpire later said that he had made a mistake and apologized for it, but his call still stands. (Sorry. I can’t remember what game it was and with early deadlines staring me in the face, I don’t have time to look it up or call my grandson for information.)

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As most of you already know, this issue (July 8) of The News-Reporter was produced and printed on Thursday, and Friday, July 1-2 so that our staff and employees could have a few days off. We will catch up what we missed in reporting on Monday, July 12, so be sure to call and give us your news. Especially call The Office Cat, because I’m going to need lots of information. The number is still 706-678-2636.

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Some of the residents of Washington Manor planted gardens and are beginning to reap what they have sewn. They have tomatoes, beans, squash, and flowers. Iris Corbett, who is 90+, planted sunflowers and they are 12 ft. tall now. . . . I think maybe you can see a picture of them elsewhere in this paper.

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After seeing a coyote loping through my backyard about eight o'clock Saturday morning, I'm wondering if he's the culprit who dug up "Pop-Up," my cat. He stopped under a tree to scratch himself and when I slammed the door he headed for that clump of bushes where the deer, the fawn, the fox, and who knows what else, always go. Knowing of reports of a rabid fox in Oconee County, I didn't challenge the coyote. It's just a hop, skip, and a jump from here to Oconee. . . . I tried to call two men that I knew to be up-to-date on coyotes, to ask about coyotes, but they are both unlisted. If Jeff or Floyd can give me some information, I wish you would call me at 706-678-2636. I’m afraid to let The Beagle go in the backyard. . . . Isn’t eight o’clock a bit late for a coyote to be out?

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Even though this issue of The News-Reporter is dated July 8, this column is being written on Thursday, July 1, and I’m still in the patriotic mode for the Independence Day celebration. I found the following statement in a little book titled “The Pocket Book of Patriotism” by Jonathan Foreman. It’s attributed to Theodore Roosevelt, United States President, 1901-1909. “Americanism means the virtues of courage, honor, justice, truth, sincerity and hardihood -- the things that made America. The things that will destroy America are prosperity at any price, peace at any price, safety first instead of duty first, the love of soft living, and the get-rich-quick theory of life.”

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Reeves Chapel Baptist Church will have a youth day celebration Sunday, July 18, 11:45 a.m. Guest speaker will be Minister Latoya Andrews of Statesboro.

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Springfield Baptist Church Men will sponsor a program on Sunday, July 18, at 4 p.m., with Rev. Lionel Wilson of Atlanta as guest speaker.

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