2010-12-23 / Front Page

History Channel to air ‘Decoded’ episode on lost Confederate Gold

By KIP BURKE news editor

Washington’s Dr. Mark Waters (right) tells the story of the lost Confederate gold to “Decoded” correspondents (from right) Scott Rolle, Christine McKinley, and Buddy Levy at the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond. The cameraman is Patrick Higgins. The episode will air next Thursday, December 30, on the History Channel. Washington’s Dr. Mark Waters (right) tells the story of the lost Confederate gold to “Decoded” correspondents (from right) Scott Rolle, Christine McKinley, and Buddy Levy at the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond. The cameraman is Patrick Higgins. The episode will air next Thursday, December 30, on the History Channel. The story of the lost Confederate gold in Washington-Wilkes will be featured on national television next Thursday night as a new History Channel program examines the mystery of what ultimately happened to the near-legendary lost gold. Local expert Dr. Marshall P. Waters is a contributor and may be featured in the program.

The episode will air Thursday night, December 30, at 10 p.m. on the History Channel.

In the new 10-part series “Brad Meltzer’s Decoded,” best-selling author Brad Meltzer and his team investigate what they say are the “real stories” behind historic secrets, such as the allegedly missing White House cornerstone, the hidden messages of the Statue of Liberty, and what really happened to John Wilkes Booth, according to the History Channel, in addition to the location of the lost gold.

For the story of the lost Confederate gold, the History Channel interviewed Dr. Waters at the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia, in September. “They originally got the storyline from two articles I wrote,” Waters said. “We’ve been exchanging e-mails for more than a year on this, and it finally came to pass in September.”

The History Channel paid Waters’ way to Richmond, where the filming went for a little over two hours, he said. “The director started, then stopped, then started and stopped because, apparently, I was telling the story with more detail than he wanted. Ultimately, I gave them the facts, the story of the journey of the money to Washington-Wilkes.”

At the same time, a producer and film crew was visiting Washington and Wilkes County, taping segments at the Mary Willis Library, on The Square, at Regions Bank, and at Chennault Plantation as historian Robert Scott Davis told the story about the robbery.

Waters says his portion may wind up on the cutting room floor, but he feels that Washington and Wilkes County will benefit from the exposure. “What I hope comes about is that Washington and Wilkes County get proper recognition for their Civil War heritage. That’s the most important thing.”

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