2011-12-01 / Front Page

‘A Christmas Carol’ is a classic story of a man’s life, love, loss, and redemption


Carolers from the Washington Little Theater production of “A Christmas Carol” lent an old-time atmosphere to the first Candlelight Shopping event. Carolers from the Washington Little Theater production of “A Christmas Carol” lent an old-time atmosphere to the first Candlelight Shopping event. “Christmas, a humbug? Why, you don’t mean it, Uncle!”

But Fred’s Uncle Ebenezer Scrooge meant exactly that. It all changed, however, when the whimsical flurry of circumstances introduced Scrooge, played by the talented and versatile Billy Creel, to characters of the spirit world on a Christmas Eve long ago. These encounters gave him eyes to see and a heart to understand the true meaning of life, love, loss, and the chance to change, and make a new beginning, just like Christmas gave to all humanity over two centuries ago and ever since.

As Charles Dickens’ story of “A Christmas Carol” comes to life upon the stage, children see the characters and action unfold with wonder. As people grow older, they see it more – and wonder – as we begin to see our own selves in the various representations and appreciate the blessing of being given another chance. That is one of the aspects that makes “A Christmas Carol” such a classic tale that never tires of the telling, or especially, the reading of it.

The themes that run through Dickens’ story are as old as the Bible. A boy’s dreadful relationship with his father, a sense of inadequacy that spurs a noble but blind ambition to attain a life of riches instead of a life full of richness. The saving grace of a woman’s care and love, and the inability of the main character to allow himself to let that love change and guide him. Opportunities for happiness missed for the inability to see them right in front of him.

But when someone truly loves you, something inside you never forgets. It leaves an ember that can glow again and burst into flame. And Scrooge finds that moment, or better, the moment finds him through the intercessory spirit of his dead partner Jacob Marley, played with ghoulish finesse by Hank Gautreaux.

Come and let the beauty of this classic story deepen your experience of this holy and marvelous season. A superb cast brings “A Christmas Carol” to life on stage, with music, singing, dancing and other shenanigans at the Bolton Lunceford Playhouse. Performances are this Friday and Saturday, and next, December 2, 3, 9, and 10 at 7:30, with a matinee Saturday, December 3, at 2 p.m. For reservations, phone 706-678-9582. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for ages 12 and under.

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