2012-02-23 / News

Crook recognized by W-WSAR for Revolutionary Days help


Deanne Crook (left) offered her building on The Square to Thomas Owen and the rest of the members of the local Sons of the American Revolution organization during Revolutionary Days. The building was used for living history presentations and demonstrations. Deanne Crook (left) offered her building on The Square to Thomas Owen and the rest of the members of the local Sons of the American Revolution organization during Revolutionary Days. The building was used for living history presentations and demonstrations. Deanne Crook of Griggs-Ficklen Insurance Company was awarded a Certificate of Appreciation by the Washington-Wilkes Chapter Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) for allowing her building to be used for Revolutionary War living history presentations during Revolutionary Days.

“Without her help, the program would not have been a success,” said Thomas Owen, SAR living history coordinator. “The Georgia SAR was grateful to have her as a volunteer.”

The team in Crook’s building provided 18th century demonstrations and educational programs to over 400 visitors, bringing more than $1,000 in sales in less than three hours.

Aiding in the success of the site, the Ruffin Flag Company decorated the building with patriotic flags and streamers.

Several other buildings played important roles during Revolutionary Days as well.

The Wilkes County courthouse served as the headquarters for George Washington and Elijah Clark while the children’s militia drill took place on the lawn. Over 50 children participated in the drill and received 18th century tricor hats to keep as souvenirs.

The Fitzpatrick Hotel hosted several musicians as well as Betsy Ross (Laura Toburen) stitching an American flag.

The Robert Toombs House received 219 visitors who were entertained by living history actors, spinning wheel demonstrations, and period violin and piano music.

The newly renovated Revolutionary War room at the Washington Historical Museum was staffed with educational demonstrations and period actors who entertained 98 visitors.

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