2012-06-28 / The Office Cat

The Office Cat

You may have already missed the deadline

While attending the recent reunion of the Washington High School Classes of the 1950s, Kathryn Green Lance told me several interesting things about her high school days here in the 1950s. She and her husband, Chris Lance, a native of Wilkes County, now live in Griffin. Kathryn is the daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Oscar Green. He was pastor of the First Methodist Church here. Kathryn remembers that her dad would occasionally let her drive his 1956 Chevrolet to school. She would pick up her friend, Patricia Cheney (Britt), and off they would go feeling very grown-up and independent. Her dad sometimes asked her to get his car filled with gas at Amos Martin’s Gulf Station on her way home and charge it to him. A couple of weeks later when the bill came from Amos, her dad called her into the living room and he had a very serious look on his face. He said he had to discuss something very important with her. “I know,” he said, “that I told you to fill the gas tank at the Gulf station, but from now on you must ask for the regular gas. It’s 25 cents a gallon. You got the Gulf No-Nox gas. We just can’t afford that at 37 cents a gallon.” Kathryn says she has remembered that conversation so many times through the years when she has watched the price of gas go up. … Find out what happened to that 1956 Chevrolet in next week’s column.

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Mark and Emilie Waters had many children and grandchildren visiting last week and they all had a great time, going in all kinds of directions while visiting. When it came time for the first meal, they gathered in the dining room for a table heavy with all kinds of delicious food. They were all surprised and delighted when one of the little grandchildren said, “Look, Mommy. Real food!”

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Cornelia Johnson was delighted last week to receive an extra copy of The News-Reporter containing pictures of her granddaughter, Brittany Guin, when she was named valedictorian of the Washington- Wilkes Comprehensive High School Class of 2012. The mail was from longtime former neighbor, Kay Ficklen Neuhaus, who now lives in Texas. Kay said she thought Cornelia might need another copy of the write-up. Kay has lived in Texas for a long time now. She has a brother whom we all called “Buddy” and her parents are the late Mr. and Mrs. Albert Ficklen. I think that at one time they might have lived in the same house that Cornelia lives in now as well as the one down the street a bit. . I expect that we’ve all heard the saying that cats have nine lives. Smythe had a black and white cat that followed him all over the yard when he was doing yard work in his “retirement.” When Smythe raked a pile of leaves onto a tarp, the cat would hop on for a ride to the street. The cat’s name was Pop-up because he always popped up from under the back steps when it was suppertime. Smythe died in 2010 and three months later Pop-up died mysteriously. We buried Pop-up in the backyard near two Bulldogs. A few days later, something dug him up, and we buried him again. This time we put a six-inch deep slab of granite over his grave with bricks around it. For several days last week I had seen a flash of black and white along the edges of our property, reminiscent of Pop-up. I put out food, hoping to entice him to stay, if indeed it was a cat, and maybe run off a few squirrels. Early Thursday morning when I took the Beagle out to his pen, there sat a cat the “spittin’ image of” Pop-up on Pop-up’s grave.

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Summer Drama Camp sponsored by the Washington Little Theater completed an intense two-week camp with the presentation of two plays which were well-attended this past weekend. The Junior Group directed by Libby Foster presented “The Princess King.” April Shelton directed the seniors in “The Mysterious Case of the Missing Ring.”

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It’ time now to move on to the next production by the Little Theater which will be an encore production of that favorite musical comedy, “Smoke on the Mountain,” at The Playhouse on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, July 26, 27, and 28, at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, July 29, at 3 p.m. More about this in next week’s column.

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As has been our custom for the last few years, in observance of Independence Day (July 4), The News-Reporter and Radio Shack will close Friday, June 29, at 5 p.m. and will remain closed through the week of July 1-7. … If you are reading this early on Wednesday, June 27, you still have a little time to meet the early deadline for the July 5 News-Reporter which will be printed this week. Deadline for legal and classified advertisements is 3 p.m.; and the deadline for all other news and retail advertising is 5 p.m., June 27.

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Several reports have been received that two peacocks have been seen wandering along the Lincolnton Road. We’re hoping that the owners will find them and get them back home before they get killed by the traffic or by some uncaring person. They are too beautiful to be slaughtered.

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I didn’t know that squirrels like peaches – but I should have known, because they will eat just about anything. Susan Pope on Spring Street says she has seen them eating peaches in her yard and that they have about stripped her tree. … We surely do need to do something about the squirrel population. I have a solution which I am about ready to get started.

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The annual Fourth of July celebration on The Square will get underway at 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 3, with all kinds of entertainment and vendors available. Don’t eat supper before you get to The Square. There will lots of food available. The fireworks display will begin just after dark – about 9:30 p.m.

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The annual Independence Day Parade on July 4 will get underway as usual at 8 a.m. sharp Wednesday morning. This is a walking parade with no motorized vehicles allowed. The parade will begin in Fort Washington Park behind the courthouse and take its usual route to The Square, through town, and back to the park. A short patriotic program will be held at the park and prizes will be awarded in several categories.

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