2012-10-18 / News

Police chief says dept. should reflect ‘great community’


Washington Police Chief Theodosia Glenn (center) spoke to the Washington Rotary Club and was accompanied by Lt. Robert Roca. Jerry Stover (left) was program host. Washington Police Chief Theodosia Glenn (center) spoke to the Washington Rotary Club and was accompanied by Lt. Robert Roca. Jerry Stover (left) was program host. The City of Washington Police Department is “committed to fairness and dedicated to protecting the rights of all the people,” according to Chief Theodosia Glenn, who spoke to the Washington Rotary Club about her job and the city’s peace-keeping force.

“It’s not an easy job,” she said, “but the people in Washington make it easier. We have a great community and the police department wants to reflect that as well.” Glenn took over as chief in March of this year after serving as acting chief for some time in the absence of former chief Mike Davis, who taught her things she will never forget, she said.

“We want to show strength, respect, and compassion for the people we serve,” Chief Glenn said, and she pointed out that careful hiring is part of her department’s commitment to excellence. When hiring, she said, she’s not looking for someone to just fill a spot, “we want somebody who will fit in to our community.”

She explained that all officers must pass 480 hours of mandated classes in 12 weeks of intense train- ing, usually at Athens Regional Academy. Also, before assuming full duties in Washington, each officer candidate must spend three months of field training riding with a seasoned officer. Each must also complete annual training in the use of firearms and at least 20 hours of additional state-mandated training.

“Most of our guys go way over that,” she said.

Statistically, the chief reported that the Washington Police Department answers 600-800 calls per month, depending on the time of year. She said that DUI arrests are particularly high at present and although that is a problem, “We are happy to be getting them off the roads.” Due to the economy, she said, burglary is also up, and particularly troublesome is assault and domestic violence.

Alluding to accusations that the Washington police concentrate their efforts in certain parts of town, Glenn pointed out that the police don’t initiate calls. “We go to where we are called from,” she said. “We don’t initiate the calls – they call us and we respond.”

When asked about the drug problem in Washington, Glenn reported that prescription drug abuse is the worst problem facing her department.

She also said that “PCP is back,” indicating a growing use of the drug most popular a number of years ago.

Return to top