2017-02-16 / Front Page

Revolutionary Days celebrates 238th anniversary


A patriot sharp-shooter (left) helps send British invaders running during a re-enactment last weekend. After the skirmish, one of the victors, Don Thomas of Lincoln County, enthralls onlookers with his stories. A patriot sharp-shooter (left) helps send British invaders running during a re-enactment last weekend. After the skirmish, one of the victors, Don Thomas of Lincoln County, enthralls onlookers with his stories. The streets of Washington were once again converged upon by leather-clad militia men and formally dressed soldiers in celebration of the 238th anniversary of the Battle of Kettle Creek last weekend for the annual Revolutionary Days. The weekend-long event highlighted the victory gained by Wilkes County’s militia and the “Heroes of the Hornet’s Nest,” along with other Revolutionary War patriots.

Early morning musket salutes and a flag raising set to honor those patriots began the festivities on Saturday, which was soon followed by a grandiose march of portrayers mirroring the whispers of early American colonialism.

This march of soldiers around The Square led directly into a vivid re-enactment of the Battle of Kettle Creek, where Tory screams and rebel retaliations brought to life the prominent battle. The thrilling epic reanimated the American patriot force rallying to victory through the puffs of grey musket smoke and canon roars as they successfully forced the British invaders into retreat, while a crowd of eager onlookers rallied with them on the sidelines.

Other festivities included pageantry and wreath presentations held at War Hill to honor the Heroes of the Hornet’s Nest for the 1779 success in Loyalist resistance, with tours and information of the battlefield being given throughout the day.

The ceremony featured the Continental Army, Georgia Militia, musket volley salutes, SAR, along with the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Children of the American Revolution, hereditary organizations, state and national officials, and the high school JROTC.

A morning of prayer on Sunday brought the festivities to a close as a colonial service at Phillips Mill Baptist Church sent the soldiers on their merry way.

The pomp and circumstance of the Revolutionary War remembrance will return again next year.

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