2017-03-16 / The Office Cat

The Office Cat

Looking forward to baseball

I hope you remembered to set your clocks ahead an hour on March 12 and got going on Daylight Saving Time in time to get to church at the right time Sunday morning ... I wish we could just leave the time one time the whole year and not have to change back and forth. But who am I to say? Nobody.

. It really is beginning to look a lot like spring today (Friday, March 10,) but according to the weatherman we’re in for some of the coldest weather of the season next week. Dogwoods and redbuds are beginning to show their color and we hope they will not get nipped by the cold. They are promising beautiful weather for the Tour of Homes on April 1 if we don’t get too much cold weather. Lots of flowering plants are already blooming out, too, such as the flowering quince, lily of the valley, lilies, and others.

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And that reminds me that the Lenten Luncheons and Easter are not long off. The Lenten Luncheons are held each day leading up to Easter at a different church each time with the pastor of that church in charge ... Easter is April 16.

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Did you see the full moon one night last week. I don’t know if it appeared more than just the one night or not ... Old Jack Frost came calling one night last week, but he was very weak and didn’t stay very long when the sun came up.

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For a couple of weeks now I have been listing (thanks to my readers) the names of people in the medical profession and especially Wilkes County doctors. Most of these have been Wilkes County natives who have become doctors with their practice being here. Several people have called and asked that I use the names of Physician Assistants as well. There are a lot of them (which I found out right away) and they are an important part of our medical community service. If you know of others, please call me at 706-678- 7781.

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The following Physician Assistants have been noted: Jim De- Weese, Tommy Bradfod, Arnold Adams, Michael Brown, Butch Dent, John Hansford, Lisa Newsome Meister, and I’m sure there are others.

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The Braves haven’t been doing too well in spring training but just you wait. When the season begins shortly, they’ll be ready and I’ll be happy. I’ve had enough of basketball and am looking forward to good ole baseball.

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I’m old, but not quite old enough to remember Wilkes County’s Million Dollar League, but I still hear a lot about it. There are a lot of baseball facts leading up to the Million Dollar League and I ran across some of them in a publication recently. Our high school baseball team of 1919 was one always counted on to bring home the honors. One writer says, “How could they lose with Arlie New to catch; Tom Graham and James McMekin to pitch; Buck Johnson at first base; Robert Wingfield at second; Worley Graham at third; Heidt Neal, Barron Shevelton, and Gus McMekin, on the team.” The team played lots of games out-of-town in spite of the fact that transportation was a BIG problem. John Green loaded his Pierce-Arrow to the gills; Blish Breeland weighted his Ford to the axles, and Joe Dyson loaned his Buick for any players who could sit, stand, or hang on. There were great arguments among the old-timers as to the best athlete Wilkes ever produced. Some chose Hillyer Johnson for his beautiful natural coordination and strength. Others favored Albert Hill. Their manager was Papa Jack (Stoy Jackson). I remember several of these players, so I guess I wasn’t as young as I thought I was. I remember Mr. Stoy Jackson quite well,

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Frank Watson recently retired as Wilkes County’s County Agent after many years of service. But in addition to his service to the county, one of his friends remembered another episode in Frank’s life and told me about it. It’s an interesting tale. The friend says: “In 1974, Frank Watson was a junior in high school and ordered a tux for the prom from the Blackmons’ store in Washington. When the order for tuxes for all the boys arrived, Frank’s was not included. Not to worry. The personnel at Blackmons’ sent to Atlanta, picked up the tux and delivered it to Frank’s home in Crawfordville where he was sweating it as to whether he would get to take his date to the prom. The next year he rented a tux and was asked why he did that after all Blackmons’ had put him through the year before. He said he wanted to give Blackmons’ a second chance and it worked. The young lady who was his date is now his wife.”

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Ladies, do you remember when you were a pre-teen or teenager in the late 1940s and early 1950s. I do. There was not much entertainment in the area so we had to conjure up our own. On many a summer day we would gather in somebody’s yard, stretch out on a blanket or towel, or just the grass, and play “Buzzards.” (Sounds gross, doesn’t it?) If you looked to the sky and saw one lone buzzard flying around you knew you would have sorrow. But there was a cure for it. If you could say “See one, don’t see two” three times and point to the buzzard before it flapped its wings, you could cancel the sorrow. If you saw two buzzards in the sky, you knew you would have joy, and you were joyful. If you saw three buzzards, it meant you would receive an important letter (or note from your boyfriend.) If you saw four buzzards, it meant you might hear from that special boyfriend, or even see him. Isn’t that silly? At least we didn’t get in any trouble, and it passed the time of day until suppertime.

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