2017-05-25 / The Office Cat

The Office Cat

Back in the saddle

Most of you know by now that I had a serious accident and a fall on my deck Thursday, May 11. The fall resulted in surgery for a partial hip replacement and has put me out of circulation for a few weeks. I was in Athens Regional for almost a week, but now I’m back in good old Washington-Wilkes for rehabilitation at PruittHealth Washington. My thanks to my granddaughter, Lizzie Holmes, for “ghost writing” this column for me last week and doing a great job. Later in this article, I’ll update you on one of the items she wrote about. My niece, Lyn Randall, has been my constant companion since the fall, and I am grateful for her care.

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The staff at PruittHealth Washington has been very efficient, outgoing, courteous, and professional, and for them I am grateful. I will tell you more about their contributions to my health as I progress in this article.

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I appreciate all the people who visited me, contacted me through phone or cards, took care of The Beagle, and otherwise supported me while I was a patient at Athens Regional. Now that I am back in Washington, please continue to tell me about your special events and give me information and assistance for this column.

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I recently noticed a marker on the post that all the big trucks like to hit at the corner of Spring and W. Robert Toombs. Mercer Harris owns that building and several more in the block and has his photography studio above the part that used to house Rees Seed and Supply. It now holds an antique mall called 2 West Antiques. The marker reads, “Cleveland’s Corner, c. 1840, Built by Aaron A. Cleveland for His Mercantile Establishment, Late 19th Century, Owned by Entrepreneur T. M. Green. – W-WHF

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I have not found much information about the restoration and renovation at the former Marion Barnett house at the corner of Main Street and Allison, but there is much work going on there. One sign says Renovation by C.R. Orr Jr. Enterprises out of Lincolnton, and the other says Restoration. We’ll see.

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I hope you didn’t miss the Flower Moon (full) Wednesday, May 10. I saw it over the Washington fire station at 9 p.m.

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There will be a lot of proud parents and families at the Washington Wilkes Comprehensive High School graduation on Friday, May 25, at 8 p.m. I can remember when some of them were born.

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Last week’s ghost writer has reason to celebrate this week. Her husband, Justin Holmes (my grandsonin law) coaches the Tennessee Tech Golden Eagles baseball team. They won the regular season championship of the Ohio Valley Conference.

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In case any of you are wondering, Lizzie’s friend, Kristen Mattson, won Cookeville’s Mealfit Cupcake Wars with her entry, “The Salted Pig.” Her home-based bakery is called JuJu Beth’s. All proceeds from the contest benefit the restoration of a historic neon sign for a local business called Cream City where they serve ice cream and coffee. The sign is just beautiful, and Lizzie is glad it will now stay intact for years to come.

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No more rain has been reported for the past two weeks in Washington Wilkes by Norris Ware or Sonny Johnson. That is, not until we had that “gulley-washer” late Saturday and early Sunday.

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According to a recent article in The Augusta Chronicle, Georgia motorists may find lower gas prices this summer over last year at the same time. Gas prices in the state are falling at a rate of 0.5 to 1 cent per day and could be under $2 per gallon by summer. The AAA Auto Club Group credits a downturn in crude oil prices and weak demand for the drop in price.

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When I came into town last Thursday from Athens, I noticed a big event on the lawn at Wills Memorial. They had food, games, and fire trucks. Even the big truck was there with its ladder extended high in the air. Tracie Haughey confirms it was the second annual Employee Appreciation Cookout for Wills Memorial staff and their families. It looked like great fun.

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Here are some more of Julian May’s long ago remembrances:

“I never had a telephone in my room. The only phone in the house was in the living room and it was on a party line. Before you could dial, you had to listen and make sure some people you didn’t know weren’t already using the line.

“Pizzas were not delivered to our home, but milk was.

“All newspapers were delivered by boys, and all boys delivered newspapers. My brother delivered a newspaper six days a week. It cost 7 cents a paper of which he got to keep 2 cents. He had to get up at 6 a.m. every morning…

“On Saturday, he had to collect the 42 cents from his customers. His favorite customers were the ones who gave him 50 cents and told him to keep the change. His least favorite customers were the ones who seemed to never be home on collection day.”

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If you grew up in a generation before there was fast food, you may want to share some of these memories with your children or grandchildren… just don’t blame me if they bust a gut laughing.

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