2017-10-12 / News

Caravaners visit Kettle Creek Battlefield to hear about history, geology, and flora


A group from the Airstream Caravan hears Joe Harris as he describes the natural history of the battlefield area. A group from the Airstream Caravan hears Joe Harris as he describes the natural history of the battlefield area. Through arrangements of Beth and Edward Jones of Virginia, about 40 retirees with a strong interest in history visited the Kettle Creek Battlefield recently.

Leaving their Airstream trailers or motorhomes at Mistletoe State Park, they arrived on a recent morning at War Hill where the group divided to hear both the battle history by Allen Burton and site natural history by Joe Harris. They had a half-hour session with each. They had come from 12 states including Nebraska and Massachusetts and were on a 41-day tour of Revolutionary War sites.

Burton described the 1779 defeat of the Loyalists to the English crown by the three Patriot militias of Pickens, Clarke, and Dooly. He emphasized the death of Boyd on the outcome. Harris described the natural and social history of the site emphasizing geology and flora and the mother church of Presbyterians in Georgia (Liberty).


RoseMarie and Gary Anderson sit with Beth and Edward Jones (l-r) during lunch at the Jockey Club. The Joneses organized a trip for an Airstream Caravan group to the Kettle Creek Battlefield and Washington as part of a 41 day tour of Revolutionary War sites. RoseMarie and Gary Anderson sit with Beth and Edward Jones (l-r) during lunch at the Jockey Club. The Joneses organized a trip for an Airstream Caravan group to the Kettle Creek Battlefield and Washington as part of a 41 day tour of Revolutionary War sites. The group had scheduled lunch at the Jockey Club after which Dr. Mark Waters described the last days of the Confederate gold. In a previous three-year caravan (30 days each year), the Caravan group had visited major Civil War sites, so Waters’ study was highly interesting and raised many specific questions from the group. Discussion continued on the sidewalk until about 2:30 in the afternoon. “I was exhausted,” Waters said later.

Cliff Hargrove, using the van offered by the First United Methodist Church, carried visitors up War hill for Burton’s talk. Hargrove, as well as Harris, Burton, and Waters were invited for lunch with the park visitors. “Interesting to have Methodists to help out,” said Beth Jones, “I’m Methodist and all of this is just like small town hospitality.”

The Joneses organized this tour, as they had that of the Civil War sites with the Caravaners. “It was always scheduled for 41 days but we had to change our itinerary for several days due to uncertainty about Hurricane Irma’s path, so we lost five couples. Yet we had 12 states represented with larger numbers from Virginia and Texas,” said Mrs. Jones.

“This was a larger group and their interests both broader and more specific than usual. Yet they were quite representative of the heritage tourist attracted to the battlefield, highly educated and able to follow their interests,” Harris observed.

Return to top