2017-10-19 / Front Page

Historical videos for high schools to be developed using battlefield


Bill Speer (l) and Mike Joiner from Advanced Technology Leaders in Augusta visit Washington as they prepare an instructional video on leadership figures Elijah Clarke and Nancy Hart. The Georgia National Guard sponsors the project. Bill Speer (l) and Mike Joiner from Advanced Technology Leaders in Augusta visit Washington as they prepare an instructional video on leadership figures Elijah Clarke and Nancy Hart. The Georgia National Guard sponsors the project. The Georgia National Guard is sponsoring development of a series of historical videos for high school students which would illustrate unsung heroes, little known events, and the Army core values as well as those of Elijah Clarke whose leadership in the 1779 battle at Kettle Creek would carry the message.

The videos will be produced by Advanced Technology Leadership of Augusta and Eagle Video Productions of Raleigh, N.C. They are scheduled to film on location at the battlefield site in mid-November. The Washington square and the Black Patriot memorial will be included; the Nancy Hart story will also be given time.

The objective of the National Guard is to bring students into contact with history, to bring life to values of the past. Thus, filming would feature a young narrator with her interest in history and also that of a local retired professional football player, Avery Sumner, who knows the battlefield site, having worked on developing trails for a couple of years.

Bill Speer is a historian who grew up in Pennsylvania and spent his adult life in Texas. He has 30 years of teaching experience which continues but from a different perspective. The educational opportunity attracted him to Georgia. He has worked with Steve Rauch, former military historian at Fort Gordon and Revolutionary War scholar.

Mike Joiner, his associate, has a military background, retiring some years back as a Colonel in Army Military Intelligence.

In conversation with Dr. Joe Harris of the Kettle Creek Battlefield Association, Speer was appreciative of the organization’s website but pointed out the need for a good map to the site location through Google Maps. He and Joiner had been directed to a Kettle Creek hamlet before finally reaching the War Hill site.

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