2017-11-16 / Front Page

Students see archaeological study in progress


A group of Lincoln County eighth-grade students listen to Tom Gresham describe his team’s archeological studies at the Kettle Creek Battlefield site. A group of Lincoln County eighth-grade students listen to Tom Gresham describe his team’s archeological studies at the Kettle Creek Battlefield site. Lincoln County eighth-grade Georgia Studies Teacher Christie Bryan recently took two busloads of students to visit the Kettle Creek Battlefield. In previous visits the class has been offered orientations to the 1779 battlefield site by historian Allen Burton and botanist Joe Harris. But coincident to the recent visit by the class of ’21, an archeological study of the battlefield was in progress when they arrived.

A Southeastern Archeological Services team from Athens, with Thomas A. Gresham as lead archeologist, was well into a day’s work when the students arrived. Gresham, with 41 years of experience, invited the group to a brief review of their studies on site. Southeastern U.S. prehistory is a Gresham favorite specialty, but another is rock pile studies. Both are important in the Kettle Creek area.

The north side of War Hill has over 100 feet of solid and loose surface rock. Rock items from Creek and Cherokee times are from more recent times, but fossil tooth and bone items dating from over 10,000 years have been found on the site and have been reported in Georgia Before People: Land of the Saber-tooths, Mastodons, and Vampire Bats by Mark Gelbart.

“The kids were still talking about the archeologists on Friday,” Bryan wrote to Harris, “We also enjoyed the walking trail around War Hill and definitely plan to be back next year.”

“It is almost equally likely that in years to come, these students, as parents, will bring their families for a visit here. It might be quite a different park then, with much more to offer,” Harris suggested.

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