2018-12-06 / News

Toombs House visitors will learn of tea’s post-Colonial importance


Iris Garden Club President Elizabeth Crabbe and Curator Marcia Campbell show the Robert Toombs House Historic Site’s newest camellia, Camellia sinensis. Iris Garden Club President Elizabeth Crabbe and Curator Marcia Campbell show the Robert Toombs House Historic Site’s newest camellia, Camellia sinensis. This Saturday, December 8, 2018, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., rain or shine, visitors can tour the beautiful Antebellum home of General Robert Toombs and enjoy a “Taste of History.” Robert Toombs, Family and Friends will present a delightful Christmas program featuring the important role tea played in the South from post-Colonial times, 1797 until 1880.

The Winter Rose – the tea plant (Camellia sinensis) – may be one of the oldest flowers known to man. The camellia has been a part of the Southern landscape since the establishment of the original 13 colonies. Today the camellia continues to grace gardens and grounds throughout Georgia from historic landscapes to contemporary specialty gardens.

The Robert Toombs House Historic Site is the home of 10 Camellia Japonicas planted in the 1940s. Some of the varieties at the Historic Site date from 1831 to 1843, with the newest addition being the Camellia sinensis planned planting December 2018.

Tickets can be purchased ahead of the event at The Robert Toombs House or the Washington-Wilkes Chamber of Commerce office on The Square for a $1 discount. Tick- ets can also be purchased the day of event. Admission is $7 for adults, $5 for children five and up, and under five years old free.

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